Course Catalog

Welcome to Mission Hills High School!  To view a .pdf version of the Course Catalog, click here.


We offer a four-year comprehensive high school program with courses ranging from Career Technical Education (CTE) to Advanced Placement (AP) classes, which may result in college credit for work done in high school. In addition to a strong academic program, MHHS provides many opportunities for students to become involved in student government, sports, music, drama, community service, and other extracurricular activities. 


How to Use This Course Catalog 


This publication contains important information for both students and parents/caregivers. A successful high school career requires careful planning and monitoring of each student’s progress. Families are encouraged to acquaint themselves with the graduation and college entrance requirements explained in these pages and use this information as they discuss and develop students’ four-year plan. 

Table of Contents 

Cliff Mitchell, Principal 

760-290-2710 

cliff.mitchell@smusd.org 


ASSISTANT PRINCIPALS

Amy Morris Hrin

Nathan Baker

Todd Marquet

Shez Sirimanne

760-290-2726

760-290-2724

760-290-2723

760-290-2722

amy.hrin@smusd.org

nathan.baker@smusd.org

todd.marquet@smusd.org

shehan.sirimanne@smusd.org



SCHOOL COUNSELORS

Susan Martinez Alejandre

Eric Cruz

Cherryl Baker

760-290-2753

760-290-2748

760-290-2749

susan.martinezalejandre@smusd.org 

eric.cruz@smusd.org

cherryl.baker@smusd.org

Kathleen Goldstein

Adriana Rios

Angela Segal

760-290-2754

760-290-2756

760-290-2750

kathleen.goldstein@smusd.org

adriana.rios@smusd.org

angela.segal@smusd.org

OTHER CONTACTS

AP Support

ASB Director

Athletic Director

Alecia Markgraf

Laura Hinman

DJ Zapata

760-290-3540

760-290-2760

760-290-2770

alecia.markgraf@smusd.org

laura.hinman@smusd.org

daniel.zapata@smusd.org

AVID

College & Career Center

Counseling Team Leader

Jamie Yorba

Marjeri Smith

Kathleen Goldstein

760-290-3355

760-290-2755

760-290-2754

jamie.yorba@smusd.org

marjeri.smith@smusd.org

kathleen.goldstein@smusd.org

EL Coordinator

Health Office

Library

Tina Hernandez

Mrs. Aperocho/Mrs. Helfand

Lora Beatty

760-290-2751

760-290-2735

760-290-2730

tina.hernandez@smusd.org

melanie.aperocho@smusd.org   jennifer.helfand@smsud.org

lora.beatty@smusd.org

CTE Team Leader

English Team Leader

Math Team Leader

David Keith

Sari Delagneau

John Guseman

david.keith@smusd.org

sari.delagneau@smusd.org

john.guseman@smusd.org

PE Team Leader

Science Team Leader

Social Science Team Leader

Curtis Hofmeister

Angelika Termin

Eddie Hackbarth

curtis.hofmeister@smusd.org

angelika.termin@smusd.org

eddie.hackbarth@smusd.org

Special Education Team Leader

VAPA Team Leader

World Languages Team Leader

Lynne Budd

Alexis Archibald

Mallory Gallagher

lynne.budd@smusd.org

alexis.archibald@smusd.org

mallory.gallagher@smusd.org

 

Graduation Requirements 

A student must earn 230 credits in order to graduate from Mission Hills High School. Each course is worth five credits per semester. Students and parents are encouraged to monitor carefully the student’s progress towards meeting these requirements. Failure to complete six classes successfully each semester will jeopardize a student’s timely graduation. 

College Entrance Requirements 

Students planning to go directly to a four-year college or university must meet college/university entrance requirements. Those interested in private colleges or universities should contact the appropriate schools early in their high school career to ensure they are taking the necessary courses. 

College and university information is available on campus in the College and Career Center. Students are invited to pursue the college catalogs and use the computerized college search programs available. In addition, a wealth of information is available on the Internet; most institutions, both public and private, maintain informative and up-to-date sites easily located with a brief search. Detailed information on Internet sites related to college selection, financial aid, and SAT/ACT and preparation is located in the College and Career Center. 

Entrance requirements for the four-year public university systems in California are outlined on the following page. Please note that students must pass with a grade of C or better in any courses taken to fulfill entrance requirements. Although D grades are considered passing for purposes of graduation, they are NOT considered passing by the university systems. 

A list of MHHS courses which meet UC and CSU admissions requirements may be found on the UC website http://www.ucop.edu/agguide/. Select the “A-G Course Lists” box, enter “Mission Hills High School” on search line, then click on view course list “Mission Hills High School (San Marcos, California).” 

San Marcos Promise 

The San Marcos Promise is an educational foundation designed to enhance the lives of students, families and the communities in North San Diego County. It offers a promise of hope and opportunity for San Marcos youth and a long- term goal of reinforcing the culture of San Marcos as a well-educated, vibrant, prosperous community for years to come. For more information on the promise programs visit the San Marcos Promise website: http://thesanmarcospromise.org/ 

CA State Class of 2023 Class of 2022 

of 2020 &

Graduation Chart


* 10 credits of CTE may replace 1 yr or LOTE or VAPA

**Any course which exceeds specific subject area requirements counts as elective credit.

 

Credits 

Credits towards MHHS graduation may be earned in the following manner: 

▪ Successful completion of courses offered during the regular school year or summer sessions. 

▪ Transfer of units from accredited private or other public schools. 

▪ Transfer of units from a community college. 

o 2-3 unit community college class = 5 credits at MHHS 

o 4-5 unit community college class = 10 credits at MHHS 

o Classes less than 2 units at a community college may not be transferred to MHHS for credit. 

▪ Completion of basic education adult school courses for high school credit. 

▪ Independent study as authorized by the California Administrative Code. 

The following limitations apply unless prior approval for exemption is granted by the principal: 

▪ While attending MHHS, a student may apply no more than 30 credits from off-campus sources (community college, adult school, college, and university) towards graduation. 

▪ All courses which meet specific requirements (e.g., English, math, etc.) must be taken at Mission Hills High School or must have been completed at another accredited private or public school prior to transfer to MHHS. 

▪ Courses identified as repeatable may be taken multiple times for credit. Students earning a grade of D in a college prep A-G course may repeat the course for additional credit providing that they earn a grade of C or higher the second time through. The initial course with the D grade will be applied as elective credits for graduation purposes. 

Expected Progress 

Students are expected to pass all classes and earn 30 credits each semester. Students who fail to accumulate credits may be transferred to an alternative setting (Twin Oaks High School) in order to get back on track for graduation. By the end of each year, students should have earned a minimum of the following credits in order to remain at Mission Hills: 

▪ Grade 9 - 25 credits 

▪ Grade 10 - 95 credits 

▪ Grade 11 - 155 credits 

Advanced Placement (AP) Classes: 

Advanced Placement courses provide a college-level learning experience. Students who enroll in AP classes are expected to take the AP exams given in May of each year. Most colleges will grant credit for scores of 3, 4, or 5 on the AP exams; thus, students may earn college credit while still in high school. Students earn an extra grade point for a grade of C or higher. State law mandates that weighted grades can be assigned only to courses designated as eligible by the University of California (UC). UC has approved weighted grades for all MHHS Advanced Placement courses as well as the honors courses in French III (H), Spanish III (H), Physiology (H), Biochemistry (H), Introduction to Engineering and Design (H) and Principles of Engineering (H). Our other honors classes have been approved by UC, but do not qualify for weighted grades. 

Incompletes: 

Incompletes are not given. Missed work due to excused absences must be made up within two weeks of the beginning of the following school term and the grade will be averaged in for a permanent grade. It is the student’s responsibility to contact teachers and make arrangements to make up work. If the work is not made up, the prior grade will be permanent. 

Transferring Students: 

A student who transfers to Mission Hills after the first six weeks of the semester with NO check-out grades from the previous school will receive grades of NM (no mark) for that semester at MHHS and will receive no credit for that semester. Students transferring to MHHS within three weeks of the end of our semester must make arrangements to complete credits in the district they are leaving prior to checking out. Mission Hills High School cannot grant another district’s credits if a student transfers in without meeting that district’s requirements. The transfer grades of students coming to MHHS will be averaged with the grades earned here when teachers compute a final grade. Students who were on track to graduate upon leaving their previous district during their senior year, but who are deficient in MHHS graduation requirements, may graduate from Mission Hills High School provided they pass six classes each semester. Students must attend MHHS their final semester in order to receive a Mission Hills High School diploma. 

Student Scheduling: 

During the scheduling process, students and parents/guardians have many opportunities to provide input regarding the courses the student should take. The student and their parents/guardians should check the transcript carefully to ensure that they are meeting graduation requirements and to use as a guide in planning the following school year. 

If parents/guardians have concerns or questions regarding classes and requirements, they should contact the counselor before student selects courses. 

Once the semester starts, class changes will only be made for a student who: 

▪ does not meet prerequisites 

▪ has taken the course over the summer, credit recovery, and/or no longer needs the class 

▪ needs to drop an elective in order to take a required classes he/she has failed 

▪ has been placed in the incorrect level of a class (e.g., honors instead of college prep) 


In order to maintain balanced class sizes, students are assigned to teachers randomly by a computer system designed to accommodate the needs of pupils, scheduled six periods a day in a total of approximately 100 different courses. 

Schedule changes will be considered during the first two weeks of the first semester for elective changes. Students requesting to drop an AP class must have parent/guardian approval/signatures. For a variety of reasons, it may be necessary to revise students’ schedules at the beginning of the second semester.

Students may not change teachers once class assignments are made. A teacher change will only be considered if the student has had the teacher for an entire school year previously. With support, students can be successful in every class with our highly-qualified teachers. A consistent policy in assigning students to classes ensures fair treatment for all. Throughout their lives, students will encounter many challenging and difficult situations. It is our responsibility as educators to help our young people develop strategies for dealing with those situations. 

If a student is experiencing ongoing difficulty in a course, the following steps must be followed: 

1. Student meets with the teacher to discuss the difficulty and identify how best to deal with the issue. 2. If further action is needed, the parent/guardian contacts the teacher. 3. After a parent/teacher contact, the matter may be referred to an assistant principal who may choose to meet 

with the parties involved.

Associated Student Body (ASB) 

An active Associated Student Body (ASB) offers many opportunities for students to participate in student government. The five top ASB positions – President, Vice President, Secretary, Treasurer, and School Board Representative, are chosen in a school-wide vote. Other students may apply to serve as one of the 12 senate commissioners, responsible for specific aspects of school life. Commissioners are selected by the elected officers in conjunction with the ASB Director. Other opportunities for involvement in student government include running for and serving as a Class Officer or as an elected representative to Student Congress. 

Performing Groups 

Students interested in visual arts, drama, music, dance and pageantry are encouraged to pursue those interests in a variety of ways. Groups at MHHS may include the following: 

The Arts Program Instrumental Groups Pageantry Dance Marching Band Varsity/JV Cheer Drama Jazz Band Dance Chorus Color Guard Ballet Folklorico Symphonic Band 

Course Description 

Descriptions of the courses offered at Mission Hills High School are outlined in the following pages. Students should take note of the grade levels at which the course may be taken, prerequisites, and the length of the course (semester vs. year-long).

Some of the abbreviations commonly used in this section are explained below. 

AP Advanced Placement (designates classes to prepare students for the Advanced Placement exams, which may result in a student’s receiving college credit for a course, even though the course was completed in high school) 

CSU California State University (identifies courses which meet the entrance requirements of that school) 

ELD English Language Development (designates English classes for those learning English as a second language) 

P College preparatory (designates classes accepted by colleges and universities for purposes of meeting their entrance requirements) 

H Honors (designates honors classes designed to prepare students for Advanced Placement classes) 

CTE Career Technical Education (designates classes funded from that source) 

UC University of California (identifies courses which meet the entrance requirements of that school) 

History 


5001/5002 WORLD HISTORY P 

Grade level: 10 A-G 

Designation: A - History 


World History focuses on the modern world. Students view essential elements of modern society within the themes of moral and ethical principles, industrialization, imperialism, war and disillusionment, human rights, and ideology and democracy. Students will read and analyze a variety of primary and secondary historical sources. Varying types of assessment, including essays, performance tasks, multiple-choice and short answer tests, and short- and long-term projects, are used to guide instruction. 


5007 AP WORLD HISTORY 

Grade level: 10 

A-G Designation: A - History 


AP World History focuses on world cultures from approximately 1200 C.E. to the present. Students view essential elements of society within the themes of moral and ethical principles, industrialization, imperialism, war and disillusionment, human rights, and ideology and democracy. The course prepares students to meet the Common Core State Standards and Advanced Placement exam in World History. Varying types of assessment, including essays, performance tasks, multiple-choice and short answer tests, and short and long-term projects, are used to guide instruction which is designed to meet the requirements for depth, complexity, novelty, and pacing required by state gifted standards and the Advanced Placement program. 


5013/5014 UNITED STATES HISTORY P 

Grade level: 11 

A-G Designation: A - History 


US History focuses on the United States, historical documents, and history from the beginning of the development of democratic traditions to the present day. Instruction is guided by essential themes and questions which focus students’ assignments, discussions, and projects. Critical events, literature, and art are placed in geographical and historical context as students gain greater awareness of the political and economic forces that affect their everyday lives. In addition to a focus on US History, writing tasks, projects and assignments align with and focus on Common Core State Standards and prepare students for the statewide assessment they will take in the spring semester. Students will take multiple Performance Tasks each semester to help prepare for this exam. Writing, reading, and critical thinking are integral and required components. 


5015 AP UNITED STATES HISTORY 

Grade level: 11 

A-G Designation: A - History 


AP United States History focuses on the United States from the time of the colonies to the present. Students look at the developing elements of American society within the themes of identity; peopling; politics and power; work, exchange, and technology; America and the world; environment and geography; and ideas, beliefs, and culture. Assessment is done via essays, multiple-choice and short answer tests, and short-and long-term projects. The course prepares students for the Advanced Placement (AP) exam in U.S. History based on College Board requirements and Common Core State Standard. Instruction is differentiated to provide the depth, complexity, novelty, and pacing required by State gifted standards and the AP program. It is noteworthy that exam includes various and numerous writing prompts; therefore, the course place special emphasis on frequent and rigorous writing. 


5021/5022 GOVERNMENT/ECONOMICS P 

Grade level: 12 

A-G Designation: A - History 


American Government/Economic focuses on the basic concepts and principles of the American political and economic systems from the beginning of the development of democratic traditions to the present. The course covers the structure and function of the American system of government, the roles and responsibilities of citizen participation in the political process, and the relationship of the individual to the law and legal system. Instruction is guided by essential themes and questions which focus students’ assignments, discussions, and projects. The class stresses critical analysis of public issues and current events, as well as integrates and reinforces social studies skills as students gain greater awareness of the political and economic forces that affect their everyday lives today and in the future. 


5023 AP GOVERNMENT 

Grade level: 12 

A-G Designation: A - History 


AP United States Government and Politics is a course that provides students with an analytical perspective on American government and politics, and requires a familiarity with the various and competing institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. politics. Students analyze political documents, including the U.S. Constitution, to establish a historical foundation for study. Students become acquainted with a variety of theoretical perspectives and explanations for various political behaviors and outcomes. Elections, campaigns, and in-depth analysis of political parties, the media, and public policymakers also drives the course of study. Students employ critical thinking, and reading and writing skills and engage in multiple modes of assessment including multiple choice exams, free response questions, class simulations, debates, and presentations. Students are also expected to stay current with political news and events. 


1401 AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY 

Grade level: 9-12 

Prerequisite: None 

A-G Designation: G - College Prep Elective 


The AP Human Geography course is equivalent to an introductory college-level course in human geography. The course focuses on the distribution, processes, and effects of human populations on Earth at different scales. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine population demographics, migration patterns, cultural diffusion, political geography, economic and urban development, and land usage. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their research and applications. The curriculum reflects the goals of the National Geography Standards (2012). 


4717 LEADERSHIP P (ASB) 

Grade level: 10-12 

A-G Designation: G - College Prep Elective 


Prerequisite: Appointment or election as an ASB officer, class officer, or commissioner, or teacher approval. 

This course provides an opportunity for students to practice democratic leadership in practical school situations. Students share with adults the responsibility of planning and organizing assemblies, meetings, social and recreational gatherings, rallies, elections, and other events. 


5624 MEXICAN-AMERICAN STUDIES P 

Grade level: 10-12 

Prerequisite: None 

A-G Designation: G - College Prep Elective 


The Mexican-American studies course seeks to enhance understanding of the Mexican and Mexican-American experience, as well as the broader Latino experience. As Latinos are currently the fastest growing minority group in the nation and represent a substantial portion of the population in southern California, the focus of this course is on an understanding of the Latino background. The social, historical, political, and cultural history of Mexico is examined as well as Mexican immigration into the United States. Current issues within the Mexican-American community are investigated, including the diversity of the Mexican-American and Latino populations. 


1883 SOCIOLOGY P 

Grade level: 10-12

Prerequisite: None 

A-G Designation: G - College Prep Elective 


Sociology is the study of social groups, institutional structures, and social interaction. This course is designed to enable students to question, discuss and attempt to understand the diversity that exists among various groups in society. Students will gain a knowledge base about human behavior in relation to group mentalities that will assist them in looking at situations and groups objectively. As students research how external factors create a group mentality they will begin to gain an appreciation for diversity. 


5931 PSYCHOLOGY P 

Grade level: 10-12 

Prerequisite: None 

A-G Designation: G - College Prep Elective 


This course will provide a basic introduction to Psychology through the exploration of psychological theories and concepts. Students will learn basic skills in psychological research and review while being able to apply these skills to their own lives and the world around them. The course is designed to satisfy its main goals while developing the students’ critical thinking skills, writing, reading and discussion skills. 


5204 AP PSYCHOLOGY 

Grade level: 10-12 

Prerequisite: None

 A-G Designation: G - College Prep Elective 


This course introduces students to the systematic and scientific study of human behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Included in the course are facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major fields of psychology and an overview of the methods psychologists use in their research and practice. This course is equivalent to a college course in introductory psychology. Students are expected to successfully prepare for the Advanced Placement test given in the spring. Instruction is differentiated in order to provide the depth, complexity, novelty, and pacing required by State gifted standards and to prepare students for the Advanced Placement program. 

English 


9101 ENGLISH 9 AND GAME DESIGN P 

Grade level: 9 

A-G Designation: B - English 


Students will build a foundational understanding of esports, their history, and their evolution over time, through research in multiple genres and methodologies. They will use critical thinking skills and argumentative, analytical, narrative, expository, and descriptive pieces of writing on self-selected topics within each unit’s main framework to apply their esports enthusiasm to their English study. Students will explore the meaningful and diverse ways to participate in the esports community beyond playing competitively themselves, and will connect the gaming experience to literature, both fiction and nonfiction. Challenging preconceptions of what qualifies as a text, the students will apply their understanding of literary concepts to analyze and critique how writers and game developers both make choices to convey meaning to their audiences. Becoming authors themselves, they will contribute their own characters and worlds to the genre of esports. This course also supports integrated STEM learning and principles with its emphasis on effective oral and written communication, argumentation, design thinking, systems thinking, and effective student engagement with educational technology as a means to collaborate, critically think, and communicate student thinking.


9001/9002 ENGLISH 9 P 

Grade level: 9 

A-G Designation: B - English 


ENG 9 (P) focuses on the development of world civilizations and cultures. Students are asked to explore essential elements of human development within the themes of structure, significance, truth, society, interaction, and understanding. Literature, both fiction and nonfiction, classical and modern, illuminates the historical themes that help students meet the Common Core State Standards. Varying forms of assessment include essays, written responses, projects, and academic conversations. 


9003 ENGLISH 9 H

Grade level: 9 A-G 

Designation: B - English 


ENG 9 (H) focuses on the development of world civilizations and cultures. Students are asked to explore essential elements of human development within the themes of structure, significance, truth, society, interaction, and understanding. Literature, both fiction and nonfiction, classical and modern, illuminates the historical themes that help students meet the Common Core State Standards. Varying forms of assessment include essays, written responses, projects and academic conversations. This honors level class challenges students through differentiation to provide added depth, complexity, and rigor. In addition, there is an increased amount of independent reading than what is typical in a college prep class. 


9009/9010 ENGLISH 10 P 

Grade level: 10 

A-G Designation: B - English 


ENG 10 (P) Through a thematic approach to the study of literature and written composition, students in English 10 P will expand their understanding and knowledge of literature and its essential elements of modern society. They will improve their ability to understand their connection to literature, develop writing and thinking skills, master punctuation and grammar skills,  and further improve listening and speaking skills. Varying types of assessment, including essays, performance tasks, projects, and exams, are used to support and guide instruction.  


9011 ENGLISH 10 H

Grade level: 10 

A-G Designation: B - English 


ENG 10 (H) emphasizes expository expression, both written and oral. Students will read literature spanning world civilizations and cultures. Literature, both fiction and nonfiction, classical and modern, is studied to illuminate historical themes. Students will learn to form a thesis statement, organize support information, and develop an introduction, body and conclusion appropriate for each assignment. Varying types of assessment, including essays, performance tasks, multiple-choice and short answer tests, and short and long-term projects, are used to guide instruction which is designed to meet the requirements for depth, complexity, novelty, and pacing. 

 


9017/9018 ENGLISH 11 P

Grade level: 11 

A-G Designation: B - English 


ENG 11 (P) focuses on non-fiction and fiction from the United States, from the beginning of the development of democratic traditions to the present day. Instruction is guided by essential themes and questions which focus students’ assignments, discussions, and projects. Writing tasks, projects, and assignments align with Common Core State Standards and prepare students for the statewide assessment they will take in the spring semester. Students will take multiple Performance Tasks each semester to help prepare for this exam. Writing, reading, and critical thinking are integral and required components of this course. 


9027 AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE 

Grade level: 11 

A-G Designation: B - English 


AP ENG Language and Composition (AP) is a college-level course centered on analysis and argumentation. Students study texts and issues related to contemporary and historical society to build their critical reading, writing and thinking skills. They will demonstrate these skills through class discussions, writing, and projects in both collaborative and individual settings. Students read classic and contemporary non-fiction texts including speeches, essays, letters, and visuals by diverse authors from to explore the relationship between the text’s language and its meaning. Students also use these texts to develop their own arguments with thorough reasoning and support. Students produce timed analytical and argument essays to prepare them for success on the AP Language English exam based on College Board requirements and Common Core State Standards; they also practice reading skills through multiple choice questions that will resemble those on the AP Exam. Upon completion of the course, students will have a deepened understanding of social and global issues and an enhanced ability to use their voice to both analyze and argue their position on these issues; they will also be prepared to challenge the AP Exam through strong reading and writing skills on multiple choice and essay questions. 


4260 SOCIAL ACTION THEATER P

Grade level: 12 

A-G Designation: B - English


Social Action Theater: English 12 and the Performing Arts is a course integrating English with the Arts, Media and Entertainment Performing Arts pathway in a way that emphasizes arts and social action.  Students develop and refine their personal and unique mission statement (credo) and aesthetic, which will be reflected through their year long course work including a personal monologue, reflective essay and portfolio development. Additionally students will apply their personal credo to create individual proposals for a social action arts organization. In groups, students will create and present a business plan for one of the proposed social action performing arts organizations, and design and perform a piece that would exemplify work from said organization. This business plan will be added to a digital portfolio created at the beginning of the course and added to throughout the course. This digital portfolio is one element, along with the final performance piece, which is presented to a career readiness jury panel of professionals as a final assessment.  



9025/9026 ENGLISH 12 ERWC P 

Grade level: 12 

A-G Designation: B - English


Expository Reading and Writing Course (ERWC) prepares college- and career-bound seniors for the literacy demands of higher education and the workplace. Through a sequence of rigorous instructional modules, students in this year-long, rhetoric-based course develop advanced proficiency in expository, analytical, and argumentative reading and writing. The course provides a process for helping students read, comprehend, and respond to nonfiction and literary texts. Modules also provide instruction in research methods and documentation conventions. Students will be expected to increase their awareness of the rhetorical strategies employed by authors and to apply those strategies in their own writing. They will read closely to examine the relationship between an author’s argument and his or her audience and purpose; to analyze the impact of structural and rhetorical strategies; and to examine the social, political, and philosophical assumptions that underlie the text. Course texts include contemporary essays, periodicals, editorials, reports, biographies, memos, speeches, various media, and other nonfiction texts. Written assessments conclude each unit.  By the end of the course, students will be expected to independently respond to a variety of unfamiliar, complex texts and writing tasks.  


9019 AP ENGLISH LITERATURE 

Grade level: 12 

A-G Designation: B - English 


AP ENG Literature and Composition (AP) is a college-level survey class that spans 500 years of American, British and World literature. Students study the interrelationship of the individual and society in the context of personal, social, cultural, democratic, national, and world themes. Reading classic and contemporary fiction comprised of novels, plays, short stories, poems, and literary criticism by diverse writers from varied cultures, students explore the relationship between the texts’ language and meaning. Students produce timed expository, analytical, and argument essays on a weekly basis -- developing their own writing style and voice -- that prepare them for success on the AP Lit English exam based on College Board requirements and Common Core State Standards. In addition to extensive poetry study, the instructor leads the class in the analysis of  full-length works of fiction, and the students engage in at least one independent study with a classic novel/play and/or contemporary work of their choice. Ultimately, students will leave the course with strong analytical writing skills and greater insight on how literary elements enhance the artistry of fiction. 


4778 AP CAPSTONE SEMINAR 

Grade level: 10-12 

Prerequisite: None 

A-G Designation: G - College Prep Elective 


AP Seminar is a foundational course that engages students in cross-curricular conversations that explore the complexities of academic and real- world topics and issues by analyzing divergent perspectives. Using an inquiry framework, students practice reading and analyzing articles, research studies, and foundational literary and philosophical texts; listening to and viewing speeches, broadcasts, and personal accounts; and experiencing artistic works and performances. Students learn to synthesize information from multiple sources, develop their own perspectives in research-based written essays, and design and deliver oral and visual presentations, both individually and as part of a team. Ultimately, the course aims to equip students with the power to analyze and evaluate information with accuracy and precision in order to craft and communicate evidence-based arguments. 


4780 AP RESEARCH 

Grade level: 10-12 

Prerequisite: AP Seminar 

A-G Designation: G - College Prep Elective 


AP Research allows students to deeply explore an academic topic, problem, or issue of individual interest. Through this exploration, students design, plan, and conduct a year-long research based investigation to address a research question. In the AP Research course, students further their skills acquired in the AP Seminar course by understanding research methodology; employing ethical research practices; and accessing, analyzing, and synthesizing information as they address a research question. Students explore their skill development, document their processes, and curate the artifacts of the development of their scholarly work in a portfolio. The course culminates in an academic paper of 4000–5000 words (accompanied by a performance or exhibition of product where applicable) and a presentation with an oral defense. 


2801 INTRODUCTION TO POETRY P

Grade level: 10-12

Prerequisite: None 

A-G Designation: G - College Prep Elective 


This year-long introduction to poetry class focuses on the reading and writing of poetry, with emphasis on both classical and contemporary poetics. During the course of instruction, students will use the nuances of language to develop an understanding of lyrical expression through the examination and development of various forms including the following: sonnet, elegy, ode, free verse, blank verse, found poetry, and a number of poetic traditions, including the use of poetry as a vehicle for social justice and awareness and the poetry of witness. Along with the actual writing of poetry, students will read and explore classical and contemporary poems and poets, taking time to analyze and synthesize via verbal and written response. Students will write and read widely, critically examining and reproducing various aspects of poetic craft, including imagery, metaphor, line, stanza, rhythm, diction, meter and scansion, tone, and the history of forms (sonnet, elegy, ode, etc). Through peer critique and collaboration, students will respond closely to the work of fellow writers in a supportive workshop that will culminate in their own "book" of poetry; writers at all levels of experience and comfort with poetry are welcome.



1625 YEARBOOK PRODUCTION P 

Grade level: 10-12, Repeatable 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 

A-G Designation: G - College Prep Elective 


Yearbook Production is a two semester course that provides students with multiple opportunities to practice real-world skills while developing and producing the annual yearbook from scratch. Students will be provided with specific training to enhance skills for writing copy, headlines, and captions. Participants will be trained in graphic design using innovative web-based software and Adobe InDesign and PhotoShop, and will put their knowledge into practice by designing layouts and editing digital photos. Students will be required to conduct interviews and research, meet deadlines, work both independently and collaboratively, understand the ethical responsibilities of journalism, hone communication skills, and harness creativity. Some after-school work will be required. 


6236 ELD 1 

1325 ELD 2 

Grade level: 9-12 

Prerequisites: Appropriate scores on the ELPAC and/or completion of the preceding ELD class.

A-G Designation: N/A 


Both courses are specifically designed for English language development of students who are at the emerging level of English proficiency and whose first language is not English. The students develop social and academic English language skills in the four domains of language: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. The students read, analyze, interpret and create a variety of literary and informational text types. They develop an understanding of how language is a complex, dynamic, and social resource for making meaning, as well as how content is organized in different text types and across disciplines using text structure, language features, and vocabulary depending on purpose and audience. They demonstrate knowledge of content through oral presentations, writing tasks, collaborative conversations, and multimedia. (ELD 1 and 2 - 2 periods per day – 20 credits) 


7281 ELD 3 P

7285 ELD 4 P

Grade level: 9-12 

Prerequisites: Appropriate scores on ELPAC and/or completion of the preceding ELD class. 

A-G Designation: B - English 


Both courses are specifically designed for English language development of students who are at the expanding or bridging level of English proficiency and whose first language is not English. The students develop increased proficiency in academic English language skills in the four domains of language: reading, writing, speaking, and listening according to the ELD Standards. The students read, analyze, interpret and create a variety of literary and informational text types. They develop an understanding of how language is a complex, dynamic, and social resource for making meaning, as well as how content is organized in different text types and across disciplines using text structure, language features, and vocabulary depending on purpose and audience. They demonstrate knowledge of content through oral presentations, writing tasks, collaborative conversations, and multimedia. They develop increasing proficiency in academic language shifting language use based on, task, purpose, audience, and text type. (ELD 3 and 4 – 1 period per day – 10 credits) Students will take ELD 3 or ELD 4 in conjunction with their grade level ELA course.




Mathematics 


7532 ALGEBRA I P 

Grade level: 9-12 

Prerequisite: Grade of D or better in Essentials of Algebra or a grade of a C or better in Math 8 (Intermediate Algebra/Geometry). 

A-G Designation: C - Mathematics 


The Algebra 1 course is the first course in the high school sequence aligned with the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSS-M). The purpose of this course is to provide opportunities for students to gain fluency with linear, quadratic and exponential functions. Students will engage in contrasting linear, quadratic and exponential functions, in addition to analyzing, solving and using these functions to model real-world situations. Throughout the course, students will gain understanding and use the formal definition of functions and their notation, and will use them to interpret and build functions. Students will also discover the analogous nature of polynomials with integers, and will begin their study of statistics, focusing on interpreting categorical and quantitative data. In addition to the CCSS-M standards content standards for Algebra 1, students will experience and gain fluency with the eight Standards for Mathematical Practice. 


7534 GEOMETRY P 

Grade level: 9-12 

Prerequisite: Grade of D or better in Algebra I 

A-G Designation: C - Mathematics 


The Geometry course is the second course in the high school sequence aligned with the California Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSS-M). The purpose of this course is to introduce students to formal geometric proofs and the study of plane figures, culminating in the study of right triangle trigonometry and circles. Throughout the course, students will gain experience in proving results about the plane formally, using previously defined terms and notions. Students will explore transformations, proving geometric theorems, congruence and similarity, right-triangle trigonometry and probability. In addition to the CCSS-M content standards for Geometry, students will experience and gain fluency with the eight Standards for Mathematical Practice. 


0214 GEOMETRY H 

Grade level: 9-12 

Prerequisite: Grade of A in Algebra I or grade of A or B AND teacher recommendation in Accelerated Algebra or, teacher recommendation. 

A-G Designation: C - Mathematics 


This course covers the same topics as listed in Geometry in addition to enhanced (+) standards outlined in the California Mathematics Framework for the Geometry course. Students will gain greater understanding of trigonometry through deriving formulas and proving, using, and understanding the application of laws of sines and cosines. In addition, students in honors Geometry will gain a deeper understanding of using probability models and probability experiments to make decisions. 


7538 ALGEBRA 2 FOR STRATEGIC BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

Grade level: 11–12 

Prerequisite: Grade of D or better in algebra and Geometry or teacher’s recommendation 

A-G Designation: Pending NCAA approval UC/CSU 


Coming Fall 2021! Students explore and interpret the behavior of different functions (linear, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, rational) by modeling real-world relationships found in the finance and business sectors. Through lessons based on consumer finance, students deepen their understanding of linear and polynomial functions while comparing income types, investments portfolios, and planning for retirement. Students use real case studies to create, analyze, and interpret functions that influence business decisions. Students investigate the algebra involved in managing a business, using model data from real case studies and applying these findings to create a business of their own. 


7537 ALGEBRA 2 P 

Grade level: 9-12 

Prerequisite: Grade of D or better in Geometry. 

A-G Designation: C - Mathematics 


The Algebra 2 course is the third course in the high school sequence aligned with the California Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSS-M). The purpose of this course is to extend and deepen students understanding of numbers and functions. Throughout the course, students will explore polynomial and rational functions, and their relationship to integers and rational numbers respectively. Students will examine the relationship of a function and its inverse, through exponential and logarithmic functions. Students will study trigonometric functions and expand their knowledge of statistics to include understanding of the normal distribution. In addition to the CCSS-M content standards for Algebra 2, students will experience and gain fluency with the eight Standards for Mathematical Practice. 


9874 ALGEBRA 2 H 

Grade Level 9-12 

Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in Geometry (H) or Grade of A or better in Geometry (P) and teacher recommendation

A-G Designation: C - Mathematics 


This course covers the same topics as listed in Algebra 2 in addition to enhanced (+) standards outlined in the California Mathematics Framework for the Algebra 2 course. Students will examine polynomial identities to include complex numbers and know and apply the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra and the Binomial Theorem. Students will also extend their knowledge of rational expressions by graphing more complex functions and identifying their key features. Students will gain greater understanding of trigonometry by utilizing additional identities and further investigating patterns of the unit circle. In addition, students in honors Algebra 2 will extend their understanding of probability by analyzing decisions and strategies in more complex situations. 


7369 CALCULUS

Grade level: 9-12 

Prerequisite: Algebra 2 

A-G Designation: C - Mathematics OR G - College Prep Elective 


The major purpose of this course is to provide a year-long study of an entry level pre-calculus course and an introduction to calculus. Topics include trigonometry, limits and continuity, differentiation, applications of derivatives, integration, and applications of the integral. This course is appropriate for a college-bound student. 

2223 AP CALCULUS AB 

Grade level: 9-12 

Prerequisite: None 

A-G Designation: C - Mathematics OR G - College Prep Elective 


AP Calculus AB is roughly equivalent to a first semester college calculus course devoted to topics in differential and integral calculus. The AP course covers topics in these areas, including concepts and skills of limits, derivatives, definite integrals, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. The course teaches students to approach calculus concepts and problems when they are represented graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally, and to make connections amongst these representations. Students learn how to use technology to help solve problems, experiment, interpret results, and support conclusions. 


2225 AP CALCULUS BC 

Grade level: 9-12 

Prerequisite: None 

A-G Designation: C - Mathematics OR G - College Prep Elective 


AP Calculus BC is roughly equivalent to both first and second semester college calculus courses and extends the content learned in AB to different types of equations and introduces the topic of sequences and series. The AP course covers topics in differential and integral calculus, including concepts and skills of limits, derivatives, definite integrals, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, and series. The course teaches students to approach calculus concepts and problems when they are represented graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally, and to make connections amongst these representations. Students learn how to use technology to help solve problems, experiment, interpret results, and support conclusions. 


7368 STATISTICS P 

Grade level: 9 -12 

Prerequisite: Grade of D or better in Algebra 2 

A-G Designation: C - Mathematics OR G - College Prep Elective 


This is a college level introduction to statistics. Students are introduced to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. The course has four broad conceptual themes: 1) exploring data; 2) planning a study 3) anticipating patterns in advance, and 4) statistical inference. Instruction is differentiated in order to provide the depth, complexity, novelty, and pacing required by state gifted standards and to prepare students for the Advanced Placement program. 


7367 AP STATISTICS 

Grade level: 9-12 

Recommended Prerequisite: strong algebra 2 students 

A-G Designation: C - Mathematics OR G - College Prep Elective 


This is a college level introduction to statistics. Students are introduced to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. The course has four broad conceptual themes: 1) exploring data; 2) planning a study; 3) anticipating patterns in advance, and 4) statistical inference. Instruction is differentiated in order to provide the depth, complexity, novelty, and pacing required by State gifted standards and to prepare students for the Advanced Placement program. 


Science 


Life Science 


7550 BIOLOGY OF THE LIVING EARTH P 

Grade level: 9 

A-G Designation: D - Science 


This is a college prep lecture/laboratory course based on the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) that includes the following instructional segments: Ecosystem's Interaction, Stability and Response to Climate Change, Photosynthesis and Respiration, Evolution, Growth, Structure and Function of Cells. Students will carry out investigations, use computational skills to analyze data, design solutions using engineering practices, and use language skills to relate relevant information. This class is a graduation requirement. As students achieve the Performance Expectations (PEs) within the unit, they uncover Disciplinary Core Ideas (DCIs) from Physical Science, Earth and Space Science, and Engineering. In each unit students engage in multiple Science and Engineering Practices (SEPs) and Crosscutting Concepts (CCCs) as tools to make sense of their observations and investigations.


7556 BIOLOGICAL OCEANOGRAPHY P

Grade level: 9

A-G Designation: D - Science 


During the academic year, students will learn how to apply scientific processes to analyze and solve problems by interpreting scientific data and drawing logical conclusions. The class will be unique in that it integrates the sciences (marine biology, earth science, chemistry, and physics), presenting them as a single area of study in Oceanography.  Emphasis will be on developing process laboratory skills including data collection and analysis, evaluation of information, and oral and written communication of experimental results. Students will begin learning about oceans by first being introduced to our planet Earth and plate tectonics. Oceanography topics covered will include basic navigation, marine provinces, marine sediments, bathymetry (including erosional features due to submarine rivers and turbidite deposits, seamounts vs. guyots, and coral reef evolution), the properties of water including ocean currents, and the oceans and climate change (with subtopics that include waves, tides, and coastal geology).  Marine biology topics covered will include cells, genetics and traits, evolution and natural selection as well as adaptations of some pelagic and benthic organisms, and ecosystems interactions including marine food webs. The course will conclude with students evaluating how climate change may impact the oceans, coastlines, and marine organisms and habitats.  


3030 AP BIOLOGY 

Grade: 10-12 

Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in Biology and a B or better in Chemistry recommended. 

A-G Designation: G - College Prep Elective 


This is a university level lecture/laboratory course taught in accordance with College Board standards. Topics covered include biochemistry, ecology, genetics, anatomy, physiology, evolution, animal behavior, molecular and cell biology, and plant and animal physiology. Instruction is differentiated in order to provide the depth, complexity, novelty, and pacing required by State gifted standards and to prepare for the Advanced Placement Program. Students are expected to take the AP Biology test in the spring and have the opportunity to receive college credit. 


7552 FORENSIC SCIENCE P 

Grade level: 11-12 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of one year of physical science, and one year of life science 

A-G Designation: G - College Prep Elective 


Forensic science is the application of multiple scientific disciplines to the investigation of criminal or civil questions of the law. Forensics science utilizes the principles, facts, and lab techniques from the fields of chemistry, biology, physics, earth science, anatomy and physiology to analyze and interpret evidence within the realm of our legal system. We will begin with an introduction to scientific inquiry and the process of forensic investigation. We will then apply our knowledge of investigation to the analysis of trace evidence (hair, fiber, fingerprints, etc.), DNA, blood, bodies, ballistics, toxicology, entomology, botany and anthropology. Students will actively participate in labs and activities relating to the investigation of crime scenes and the analysis of evidence while developing their writing, problem solving and critical thinking skills. In addition, the ethical, legal, and social concerns surrounding forensics will be discussed. This course meets the University of California and California State University entrance requirements. 


5401 HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY H 

Grade level: 11-12 

Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in Biology (H, P, or Biomed) and C of better in Chemistry recommended. A-G Designation: G - College Prep Elective 


Human Anatomy and Physiology Honors is a course for students who are interested in an in-depth understanding of the structures and functions of the human body. It was significantly greater depth than college preparatory anatomy and Physiology requiring application, analysis, and evaluation of the material, the understanding and use of concepts as well as facts regarding the interrelatedness of the human body systems. This course is recommended for those pursuing a career in the health science field in college. It has a substantial laboratory component, including several dissections, which will complement lectures, discussion and demonstrations. This course has been approved for a weighted grade through the University of California (UC). 


Physical Science 


3646 CHEMISTRY IN THE EARTH SYSTEM P 

Grade level: 10-12 

Prerequisite: none 

A-G Designation: D - Science OR G - College Prep Elective 


This is a college prep lecture/laboratory course based on the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) that includes the following instructional segments: Combustion, Heat and Energy in the Earth System, Atoms, Elements, and Molecules, Chemical Reactions, Chemistry of Climate Change, Dynamics of Chemical Reactions and Ocean Acidification. It is recommended that students have a scientific calculator. This class is a graduation requirement. As students achieve the Performance Expectations (PEs) within the unit, they uncover Disciplinary Core Ideas (DCIs) from Physical Science, Earth and Space Science, and Engineering. In each unit students engage in multiple Science and Engineering Practices (SEPs) and Crosscutting Concepts (CCCs) as tools to make sense of their observations and investigations.

3548 AP CHEMISTRY 

Grade level: 10-12 

Recommended: Grade of C or better in Chem 

A-G Designation: G - College Prep Elective 


AP Chemistry is a comprehensive, college level chemistry course taught in a high school setting. AP Chemistry provides students with a foundation to support future advanced coursework in chemistry. Through inquiry-based learning, students develop critical thinking and reasoning skills. Students cultivate their understanding of chemistry and science practices as they explore topics such as: atomic structure, intermolecular forces and bonding, chemical reactions, kinetics, thermodynamics, and equilibrium. A special emphasis is placed on developing scientific skills through the planning and conducting of laboratory investigations. As preparation for the AP exam, chemistry students will work toward mastery of the following skills: 

● Solve problems mathematically and conceptually 

● Design and describe experiments 

● Perform data and error analysis 

● Explain, reason, or justify answers 

● Interpret and develop conceptual models. 


3886 PHYSICS OF THE UNIVERSE P 

Grade level: 10-12 

Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in Geometry or Algebra II recommended. 

A-G Designation: D - Science OR G - College Prep Elective

 

Physics of the Universe is a laboratory-based college preparatory course. The course is defined in the 2016 California Science Framework, integrating Physics and Earth and Space Science standards from the California Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). The course is divided into six units (instructional segments) centered on questions about observations of a specific phenomenon. As students achieve the Performance Expectations (PEs) within the unit, they uncover Disciplinary Core Ideas (DCIs) from Physical Science, Earth and Space Science, and Engineering. In each unit students engage in multiple Science and Engineering Practices (SEPs) and Crosscutting Concepts (CCCs) as tools to make sense of their observations and investigations.


3564 AP PHYSICS 

Grade Level: 10–12 

Recommended Prerequisite: Grade B or better in geometry, concurrent enrollment in algebra II or higher A-G Designation: G - College Prep Elective 


This is a university level lecture and laboratory science course taught in accordance with the College Board standards. In this algebra based, intensive, fast paced class, we will cover the following topics: linear motion, forces, particle motion and circular motion. Further topics include gravitation, momentum and energy as well as rotational motion, simple harmonic motion, waves and electricity. 


4495 BIOCHEMISTRY H

Grade level: 11-12 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology and Chemistry 

A-G Designation: G - College Prep Elective 


Students can receive 5 units college credit and co-enroll with CSUSM for a fee. The 5 units college credit are transferable to any college in the US. This course provides a foundation for students pursuing a degree in a health or science related field: Medicine, nursing, pharmacy or research. This class can also count as a general education physical science requirements at a lower division college level. Biochemistry is a rigorous laboratory science course that focuses on the basic principles of general, organic, and biochemistry as needed to understand the physiology and pharmacology of the human body. Students are introduced to foundational organic and biochemistry and its correlation to human physiology, health, medicine, and nutrition. Instruction is differentiated in order to provide the depth, complexity, novelty, and pacing required by CSUSM. This course has been approved for a weighted grade through the University of California (UC). 


5408 AP ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 

Grade level: 11-12 

Recommended Prerequisite: Completion of one year of life and physical science. 

A-G Designation: G - College Prep Elective 


Advanced Placement Environmental Science is designed to be a college level lecture/laboratory course. The goal of this course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, and to evaluate the risks associated with these problems while examining alternative solutions for resolving and/ or preventing them. 


4716 LEADERSHIP P (Laboratory Technician) 

Grade level: 11 – 12 

Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in Chemistry or Honors Chemistry and Teacher Recommendation 

A-G Designation: G - College Prep Elective 


Science Department Laboratory Technicians are assigned to teachers to assist in the preparation of laboratory supplies for the various courses offered at Mission Hills. Lab Techs need to aware of common laboratory techniques and scientific process in order to properly assist a teacher. 


Language other than English 


AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE 


6852 AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE 1 P 

Grade level: 9-12 

Prerequisite: None 

A-G Designation: E - Foreign Language 


American Sign Language 1 is an introduction to ASL emphasizing basic communication skills in receptive, expressive, and writing. The focus of the class will include receptive and expressive skills (basic signs, grammar, finger-spelling) and awareness of Deaf culture. 


6853 AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE 2 P 

Grade level 10-12 

Prerequisite: Grade D or better in American Sign Language 1 

A-G Designation: E - Foreign Language 


American Sign Language II is an intermediary course to American Sign Language as it is used within the Deaf community. Instruction includes new vocabulary, construction of complex sentences, as well as a deeper look into the history and culture of Deaf people. 


6854 AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE 3 P 

Grade level 11-12 

Prerequisite:Grade D or better in American Sign Language 2 

A-G Designation: E - Foreign Language OR G - College Prep Elective 


Develop vocabulary, conversational competence, and grammatical knowledge with a total immersion approach. Introduces increasingly complex grammatical aspects including those unique to ASL. Discusses culture and literature. Contact with the Deaf Community is encouraged to enhance linguistic and cultural knowledge. 


FRENCH 


4071 FRENCH 1 P

Grade level: 9-12 

Prerequisite: None 

A-G Designation: E - Foreign Language 


This course provides an introduction to the French language and the culture of French-speaking people. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are included. 


4085 FRENCH 2 P

Grade level: 10-12 

Prerequisite: Grade D or better in French 1 

A-G Designation: E - Foreign Language 


Conversation, communication, and composition are emphasized in this course, which focuses on grammar and vocabulary. The class is conducted in both English and French. 


4111 FRENCH 3 H

Grade level: 11-12 

Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in French 2 recommended 

A-G Designation: E - Foreign Language OR G - College Prep Elective 


French III Honors is creative and fun, yet rigorous. Students build upon communicative and grammar skills learned at previous levels of French. Pupils are evaluated on their abilities to clearly communicate by reading, writing, speaking, and listening, while learning more about the history of literature of French-speaking places around the world. This course is designed to prepare students to be confident, proficient communicators and critical thinkers who desire to continue their studies in the French language. Emphasis is also placed on the exploration of French literature, history, cuisine, music, film, and the world of art. This course is conducted in French. This course has been approved for a weighted grade through the University of California (UC). 


SPANISH 


4352 SPANISH 1 P

Grade level: 9-12 

Prerequisite: None 

A-G Designation: E - Foreign Language 


This course provides an introduction to the language, culture, geography, and lifestyles of people throughout the Spanish-speaking world. Emphasis is on listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills which provide the foundation for the following years of world languages study. 


4365 SPANISH 2 P

Grade level: 9-12 

Prerequisite: Grade D or better in Spanish 1 

A-G Designation: E - Foreign Language 


In this course, students continue to expand their Spanish-language skills in the areas of grammar, vocabulary, reading, writing, listening comprehension, and speaking. 


4379 SPANISH 3 P

Grade level: 10-12 

Prerequisite: Grade D or better in Spanish 2 

A-G Designation: E - Foreign Language OR G - College Prep Elective


This course places a strong emphasis on advanced grammar, the acquisition of sophisticated vocabulary, and the ability to communicate fluently in Spanish. The class consists of reading, speaking, listening comprehension, writing, and synthesis of previously learned concepts. 


4901 SPANISH 3 H 

Grade level: 10-12 

Prerequisites: Grade B in Spanish II recommended. 

A-G Designation: E - Foreign Language OR G - College Prep Elective